Design choices affect your rental yield

Some, if not most, people look to property as a way of making money. The attraction with being a landlord is that it offers you lifestyle options, a stream of income that once set up, provides you with income so you can get out and make the most of life. Is it unfair to say there is a secret landlord inside most of us? If you are able to let out a property, making the right design choices may allow you to reap the most income possible, because it gives a good feel to a tenant who would then be willing to pay a high rent.

Every single decision you make – from the smallest design detail to the selection of finishes and furniture, and the overall arrangement or layout of a room – has an impact on the way that your entire home feels. Together, these decisions can have a profound effect on the way you live your life, and the dynamic you create within it.

Building a conservatory or an extension on your home can add massive value. Not only can it transform the quality of the architecture in your ground-floor spaces, but the additional space will also increase the overall floor area of your house, which will automatically increase its value when the estate agent whips round with his tape measure. Best of all, if your new spaces are well designed, you’ll certainly add that ‘wow’ factor. In fact, extensions are a magical way to flood your house with light, create space where you didn’t even know you had it, and open up the rooms in your home to make them work the way you want them to.

The first question that you have to ask yourself is what kind of extension you want and why? Before even considering your options, you need to analyse your existing house plans very carefully to fully understand the impact your extension will have on the design of your existing house. You also have to be sure that whatever you build completely fits your needs. The most common form of extension on a property is a ground-floor rear extension; the most popular form of extension is a rear, ground-floor addition. Both of these can have a substantial and dramatic effect on the way that the ground-floor spaces work.

In many cases, these types of extensions are used to expand the kitchen-dining area, which has pretty much become the heart of the typical British family home. Creating additional space where the average family needs, wants and uses it most means that you’ll not just be making your home more productive in terms of space, but you’ll be in a fantastic position if and when you do come to sell.

Standard conservatories bought directly from a manufacturer can be even more affordable, but it’s worth being wary of this approach. If selected in the wrong style, a standard, off-the-shelf design can conflict with the architecture of the existing house. This doesn’t have anything to do with whether the extension is modern or traditional – far from it. Most people don’t have a preference for either style, as long as the design of the extension is good – and appropriate for your house. Often, however, I find that the standardised conservatories in mock Georgian, Tudor or Victorian styles don’t really work well when added to the back of a house from a different period. A well-designed and well-built extension will always be a good preference over a low-budget PVC conservatory that won’t necessarily enhance the standard of your home. The truth is that agents sometimes wonder why people do go for fully glazed conservatories with glass roofs, which they then cover completely with blinds because they are worried about their privacy! This high level of glazing is not necessarily very comfortable, either! In the winter months you can end up with a freezing-cold extension and, in the summer, the equivalent of an indoor greenhouse. A more considered design, which overcomes the issues of privacy, heat loss and solar gain , is by far the best way forward. Planned correctly, you’ll still be able to achieve fantastic views and access to your back garden.

We live in an age in which we all love a greater sense of space in our homes. Most of us don’t want to live in tiny, box-like rooms, all with a similar scale, size and proportion. Instead, we like variety in our homes, diverse spaces with plenty of light and a great flow of air. We like rooms to be sized to match our requirements; in other words, we need them to be big enough to host our lifestyles, and smaller when we want to be cosy. The lighting and finishes are then chosen to create an atmosphere appropriate to those rooms.

When it comes to bedrooms, they must be beautifully calm and comfortable spaces, for adults and children alike. The ideal bedroom should be cosy and serene, allowing your mind to be cleared of the pressures of the day when you retire to bed. When you consider the fact that we do, on average, spend nearly a third of our lives sleeping, the quality of our beds and the rooms they sit in become that much more important. The space should be beautiful; the bed should be a haven.

It makes no difference if you are a traditionalist, enjoying an over-the-top bedroom and indulging in Louise XIV-style splendour, or an avid minimalist, with a room stripped bare of any ornament, decoration or distraction. In both cases, comfort and cosiness should be the order of the day, and a fundamental part of your design brief. This means that the selection of your finishes and furnishings is actually the most important choice you will have to make in your bedroom. However, to create a fully successful bedroom, all of the principles of good design need to work together.

Bedrooms need to serve a dual purpose – lulling you to sleep and allowing you to languish in bed for those all-too-infrequent lie-ins, but also stimulating you adequately to give you the get-up-and-go you need to get out of bed in the morning. It’s also an extremely personal room, where we undress, dream, mull over the day that has passed and plan the day ahead, and also spend intimate time with our loved ones. We take to our beds when we are ill, and retreat to our bedrooms when we want a thorough rest. It’s not surprising, therefore, that creating the perfect bedroom is a challenge on a major scale.

Think carefully about your needs before working on the design brief for your new bedroom. A bedroom should be a sanctuary, but a functional one at that. Take your time to work out exactly what will work to create the optimum environment.